Useful links from the BWN Wrap Up

As promised, below please find a list of all the URLs mentioned during the Buddies Welcome Newbies Wrap Up presentation on Saturday, October 26, by Emily Safrin and Daniela Guanipa.

Thank you to all of you who attended the presentation.  We hope our paths cross again in the future… perhaps as Buddies next year? 🙂

Helen’s rate rationale

https://www.gauchatranslations.com/business-and-ethics/business-practices/

Marketing platform: MailChimp

https://mailchimp.com/

Business card reader

https://www.abbyybcr.com/en/

Mentoring program page

www.atanet.org/careers/mentoring.php

The Mentor’s Bounty: How Mentoring Enriches both Mentor and Mentee

https://atasavvynewcomer.org/2019/01/15/mentor-bounty-how-mentoring-enriches-both-mentor-mentee/

Ed Gandia’s Warm Email Technique

The Biggest Problem You’ll Face When Crafting ‘Warm Emails’ for Prospects — And What to Do About It | High-Income Business Writing

https://b2blauncher.com/crafting-warm-emails-for-prospects/

#149: How to Start Prospecting for Clients When You’re New | High-Income Business Writing

https://b2blauncher.com/episode149/

3 Case-Studies of Good Bios that Create Results

This post was originally published on Storied. It is reposted with permission from the author.

Some people want to tell their story because they have a message they’re passionate about sharing and spreading. Others want to tell a story that makes them stand out and makes them memorable so they can land better job and business opportunities. Whatever your reason is, by now you understand the importance of identifying your story and telling it right.

Below, I’ve included excerpts of bios from three graduates of The New About Me to illustrate some of the concepts from my last 3 posts.

Shout outs to Mark Jones, Erin Donley, and Deb Sturgess for sharing their journey with us.

1. Positioning Yourself

It’s easy to lead in your bio with buzzwords that sound good but don’t really mean anything (come on, you know you do this). We list a bunch of functions and fancy words but they’re devoid of (1) meaning, (2) context, or (3) real relevance. Notice in the two examples below, how a transformation takes place.

In both cases, the shift better answers the question, “who you are, what you do, and who you serve.” Of course, determining your niche positioning is one of the hardest exercises for any entrepreneur to figure it out. Especially without resorting back to so many buzzwords that your message is lost in translation.

MARK JONES

Before
I am a trusted advisor to executives, boards and line managers. During my career I have assisted hundreds of subject matter experts capture, package and share their Thought Leadership.

After
My name is Mark Jones and I am an architect of change. I stand alongside the board and executive of a company and assist as they chart their way forward. It’s scary heading into the unknown, into the often unchartered waters of change. I know how that feels. As an independent advisor, I see clients challenged by complexity as they struggle to develop and execute relevant strategy effectively. My contribution to their enquiry is the union of my experience as a chartered accountant with a deep interest in leadership behaviour and how it impacts results.

ERIN DONLEY

Before
Hi, I’m Erin Donley, writer, speaker, marketing consultant, and the founder of Marketing Your Truth in Portland, Oregon.

After
Hi, I’m Erin Donley, business communications consultant in Portland, Oregon. I help entrepreneurs discover potent and original ways to speak about themselves and their work…so they can stand out, make more money, and gain a following of both quality and quantity.

2. Back Story

You probably take for granted “what you know” and how you learned it. Unless it’s your mom, your audience doesn’t have the same benefit. Your back story provides a narrative rationale for your knowledge, expertise, and personality.

While the excepts below don’t do justice to the context, they’re actually inspiring manner to explain the unique skills and approach of each person. While the idea of a back story is simple, it’s critical to choose the right symbolic examples that offer relevance to your current professional story. And don’t be afraid to show some personality.

DEB STURGESS

Before
Deb’s career traces a path through radio news, magazine reporting, news editing, promotional copywriting, technical writing, public speaking, training, and teaching. Transferable skills mean surviving through change and remaining employable, as Deb has learned from experience. She “jumped off the cliff” in February 2010 and landed exactly where she planned.

After
I’ve been coaching since 1st Grade, when I crafted a one-page story about a fish, then whispered writing advice to a classmate. My teacher, Mrs. Frampton, enjoyed my story, but still took away my recess because I talked in class. Since then, my passion for ideas and expression has propelled me through over 20 years as an educator of students ages 12 to 86, inspired me to write the script and lyrics for a musical, Mary’s Song, brought me small-town fame as a country music DJ, and helped me persuade a Secret Service agent and more than one gangsta’ to see things my way.

ERIN DONLEY

Before
Over the years I’ve become a researcher of the Language of Transformation.

After
As a kid, I was captivated by the hidden life of Joan Crawford in the movie, Mommie Dearest. My favorite TV show was Divorce Court. I refused to go to school if my horoscope wasn’t favorable, spent hours reading tombstones at cemeteries, and I knew every Barry Manilow song by heart. By age 10, a child therapist labeled me, “addicted to drama.”

3. Humanize Yourself

Thanks to our social media culture, it’s expected that you get more personal. It also helps for this revolutionary concept called “human connection”. Sounds like common sense, right? Be more human. Yet, for many of us, especially if you’re a Gen X or Baby Boomer, you were taught it’s not polite to talk about yourself (i.e. leave the personal stuff out of the office).

The world has changed, and now the personal is professional. Even if you’re audience doesn’t “geek-out” on the same topics you do, the fact that you share some of this will make you more approachable and relatable. They key is to choose the right details that are unique to you and you want to be remembered for.

 

DEB STURGESS

Before
None.

After
I’m determined to figure out how to distribute virtual tambourines to my online classes, so I can direct musical numbers to reinforce learning. I’ve been a Mac devotee since 1984. On my iPhone and iPad 2, my favorite apps are Pulp, Scrabble and I am a Dalek. I’m a compulsive book buyer who appreciates both the feel of hardbacks and the fact I don’t have to dust the books on my Kindle. I support Pluto as a planet, chocolate as a food group, and Househunters International as educational television.

MARK JONES

Before
None.

After
About 5 years ago, we moved to Sydney from Amsterdam after 20 years abroad; the surf here being infinitely better. I remain fit by following the guidance of my personal trainer [Simba my dog] and enjoy cooking the delights of Thai and Dutch cuisine.

Pretty fantastic, right?

And these are just excerpts from their longer bios. There are extensive case-studies (before/after bios) featured in “The New About Me” course.

Hungry for more storytelling tips? Try The Red Pill, my free 5-day email course that helps you get your story straight.

 

Twitter: how to tweet well at live events & conferences

 This post was originally published on Espirian. It is reposted with permission from the author.

Here are the questions and answers from my guest appearance on the #TwitterSmarter chat with Madalyn Sklar on 4 July 2019.

The topic was about the power of live-tweeting at events and conferences.

Step 1

Do you use Twitter at events/conferences? What do you tweet?

Always! Tweeting is my most effective way to take notes. Rather than scribbling things down or waiting to receive slide decks (which might not arrive anyway), I put my thoughts into tweets.

I tweet speaker quotes, facts, figures, onstage photos and emoji-powered bullet lists of action points. They’re all great for giving a flavour of the event.

John Espirian@espirian

“People never compare you fairly. They’re never comparing apples with apples. Use your content and personality to be an orange.”

🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍊🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏🍏@MrAsquith

See John Espirian’s other Tweets

Good-quality photos of slides – where the text is actually legible! – are great for giving people a bit more detail about what’s being discussed.

John Espirian@espirian

Snappy title for today’s talk by @AndrewAndPete

View image on Twitter
See John Espirian’s other Tweets

If I have any insights to add as we go along, I’ll share those, too. When I come to produce a write-up of the event, those tweets are gold and can be embedded as is.

Live Twitter videos of snippets of talks are a good way to give people a sense of the event, too. No one expects entire talks to be streamed – a few minutes is plenty.

Because rich-text formatting isn’t really possible on Twitter …

  • I use emojis to add a bit of life to my tweets.
  • They’re great as list item markers.
  • And they’re easy to insert.

Emoji shortcuts for Mac and Windows

Emoji desktop shortcuts for Mac (white) and Windows (black).
(Click to enlarge.)

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Step 2

What kind of content do you expect to see from fellow attendees?

Speaker quotes, stats and images are the most common. I like to reuse these in my write-ups, which adds value to my content while also recognising the sharer.

It’s useful to see tweets that help to set the mood music, too. Photos of the venue and activities outside are good, as are those about things that happen during breaks and lunch. It all adds to the “wish you were here” vibe.

Jemima Willcox Photography #CSMDay2019@JemimaWillcox

You know its a @AndrewAndPete party when your greeted by fire dancers 🔥🔥🔥

View image on Twitter
See Jemima Willcox Photography #CSMDay2019’s other Tweets

Look out for those who go above and beyond with their live-tweeting content. You can learn loads from the following people, to name but a few:

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Step 3

What are some ways to engage with fellow attendees on Twitter?

Follow people who are using the event hashtag before and during the event.

Be findable by adding the event hashtag to your bio at least a few days before the event. That gives Twitter time to update its search index before the event. Don’t wait until the day!

Some events use special graphics so you can update your profile photo to show that you’re attending the event. Using these and spotting them on others’ accounts can help you find people to engage with.

You can create your own public Twitter list ahead of time if you know who’s attending the event. When people see a notification that they’ve been added, they may be more like to engage with you. You can become a mini-hub for the event chatter.

The #TwitterSmarter chat might not be a live in-person event, but even things like this are good spots to engage people ahead of time. Here’s a quick promo video I made in Camtasiato promote the chat:

John Espirian@espirian

See you later today for @MadalynSklar‘s chat?

🇺🇸 10am PT
🇺🇸 1pm ET
🇬🇧 6pm UK

Today’s topic: tweeting at live events and conferences. ✊🏻

Embedded video

See John Espirian’s other Tweets

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Step 4

Do you draft posts/visuals in advance to tweet during an event?

I have a blog template ready to go so that my tweets can fit into a write-up of the event.

I sometimes create speaker visuals. I find 1200×630 pixels is best, as this works well on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook (great for repurposing).

Smart organisers have a library of hi-res images ready for this purpose, so check before doing unnecessary work. Here’s one I put together based on images provided by the CMA:

See John Espirian’s other Tweets

I find it’s best to keep speakers’ Twitter handles and relevant URLs handy (e.g. YouTube videos or ebook links, if you know they’re likely to mention them). Being the first to link to such content often gets your tweets the most attention.

Be sure to share only resources that the speaker is likely to be comfortable with being in the public domain. Content and links mentioned during a talk might be special goodies for the benefit of delegates only.

I sometimes use my BitmoJohn visuals to add a bit of personality to my tweets. Anything that makes your content stand out is good!

John Espirian@espirian

This is everyone the day after the SfEP conference.

Still, a great few days of editorial learning! Thanks, all 👍🏻

View image on Twitter
See John Espirian’s other Tweets

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Step 5

How much time do you spend tweeting at an event? How much is too much?

All the time during the main sit-down sessions. It’s the best way for me to remember what’s happened: log it all via Twitter and then write a follow-up blog to piece it all together.

But during the breaks, I prefer to talk to people. Then I catch up later with the tweets people have used to capture the ambience (group photos, food, etc.).

Making the effort to capture as much as possible means you can revisit your tweets in future and remind yourself of the lessons learned on the day.

It can be hard to keep up but if you have any spare time, check for tweets by others on the same hashtag and engage on them, too. If you support others’ stuff, they’ll support yours and everyone wins.

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Step 6

Share some tips for live-tweeting at events

Have the speaker’s Twitter handles ready in a text file so you can tag them quickly when sharing quotes.

Make the event hashtag a temporary text shortcut so that you can quickly and easily include the event in every tweet.

I use TextExpander to do this, but you can also use the native features in macOS and iOS to get the same job done.

TextExpander

TextExpander speeds up your writing

Sit in a position where you can get good photos of the speakers. Visually appealing tweets are more likely to be read and retweeted.

If you can get a preview of what the speakers are going to be talking about, that can help you prepare what you’re likely to tweet when the sessions are underway. Do your homework!

If you can meet the speakers beforehand, that’s even better. You get to understand their thoughts about the event and their mindset ahead of the presentation – and that leads to more valuable and insightful tweets during the sessions.

If you’re doing a temporary takeover of another Twitter account, remember that you’re representing them. Don’t make it about you or sneak your own links into the tweets.

Remember that it’s always polite to tag the speaker in your tweet. If they don’t have a Twitter account – imagine that! – then still mention their name and perhaps their organisation when including a quote or photo.

If you’re tweeting on another account’s behalf, make sure you have access ahead of time. A wrong password or need for 2-step mobile verification could throw you off balance at the worst time. Prepare!

Make sure your devices are fully charged or in range of a power outlet. Have a backup battery on standby, especially if you’re doing a lot of video.

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Step 7

What tools do you use to tweet during an event?

I always find it’s faster and more accurate to tweet from a device with a hardware keyboard, so my MacBook Air is an essential when I want to cover an event properly. Only if space is cramped would I use my iPhone only.

To get the best photos in my tweets, I often use a DSLR camera and connect it to my laptop with a cable. Get the camera to save images as JPEGs and you can share the results on Twitter very quickly.

John Espirian@espirian

“The future of marketing is relatability.”

👆🏻 There’s no time for ivory towers. Remember that we trust people who look like us. Not literally – but the way we think and act.

Trust is *everything*.@iSocialFanz

View image on Twitter
See John Espirian’s other Tweets

If a grown-up camera isn’t an option, a smartphone will do for the photos. I’d still recommend using a phone-to-laptop cable, so that you don’t need to rely on wireless tech to move images between devices.

If you want to create visuals to enhance your tweets, common tools worth checking out are Canva and Adobe Spark.

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Step 8

How do you follow up with people after the event? Do you use any tools?

I don’t wait until after the event to make a social connection. LinkedIn’s mobile app has a Bluetooth-powered “Find Nearby” feature. I use that with most people rather than swapping business cards on the day.

LinkedIn Find Nearby

LinkedIn Find Nearby feature (inside My Network tab on mobile).

When I do a write-up, I check in with some delegates to see whether they’re interested in contributing any further thoughts to the content. It’s good exposure for them (they get a backlink) and adds more value to everyone, whether they attended or not.

For those I’ve connected with online, the next step is always to try to have a conversation. But not a sales conversation! Simply be interested in getting to know people and see where it leads.

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Finally, in case you’re wondering about the value of being on a Twitter chat, here are my stats from the above chat about live events:

John Espirian@espirian

This is what being on the chat did to my analytics yesterday. Almost 31K organic impressions!

Thanks again for having me, @MadalynSklar 🙏🏻

30,937 organic impressions on Twitter on one day thanks to the #TwitterSmarter chat
See John Espirian’s other Tweets

PS. If you want another write-up of this chat, check out this summary on Madalyn’s own blog, kindly put together by my buddy Narmadhaa.

Five ways to make your presentation better

 This post was originally published on Seth’s blog. It is reposted with permission from the author.

 

  1. Make it shorter. No extra points for filling your time.
  2. Be really clear about what it’s for. If the presentation works, what will change? Who will be changed? Will people take a different course of action because of your work? If not, then why do you do a presentation?
  3. Don’t use slides as a teleprompter. If you have details, write them up in a short memo and give it to us after the presentation.
  4. Don’t sing, don’t dance, don’t tell jokes. If those three skills are foreign to you, this is not a good time to try them out.
  5. Be here now. The reason you’re giving a presentation and not sending us a memo is that your personal presence, your energy and your humanity add value. Don’t hide them. Don’t use a prescribed format if that format doesn’t match the best version of you.

And a bonus: the best presentation is one you actually give. Don’t hide. Don’t postpone it. We need to hear from you.

A presentation is expensive. It’s many of us, in real time, in sync, all watching you do your thing. If you’re going to do it live, make it worth it. For us and for you.

How to Scope Out Associations’ Cultures, Keep Up with Their Conferences, and Learn from Them

This post was originally published on the EditorMom blog. It is reposted with permission from the author.

Here is a 3-part tip for those who can’t afford to attend annual conferences of editorial associations and/or who are considering joining one or more associations:

  • First, bookmark links to the websites of associations you’re interested in. If you want to know about more associations than just the few you’ve already heard about, check out the association links in the “Networking” section of the Copyeditors’ Knowledge Base (CKB).
  • Second, watch those websites for notice of upcoming conferences. During conference time, head to Twitter to find the associations’ Twitter accounts. (Follow the links to those Twitter accounts that appear in the “Networking” section of the CKB.)
  • Third, follow those accounts’ tweets that are about the organizations’ conferences. (Most associations include an appropriate hashtag, or topic marker, in their conference tweets. For example, the Society for Scholarly Publishing is using the hashtag #SSP2018 for its tweets about its 2018 conference. You can search Twitter for that hashtag if you know it.)

You’ll get a good sense of what the organizations have to offer you, and you’ll also be engaging in some continuing professional development. Note: You do not have to have a Twitter account of your own to follow those tweets.

 

The Author

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East Setauket, New York, United States